The student news site of Catalina Foothills High School

The Falcon Voice

Korea: The Fire is Still Burning Nearly Half a Century Later

Intercontinental+ballistic+missiles+are+driven+down+a+road+during+the+military+parade.+Canister+launchers+are+mounted+on+the+back+of+trucks.
Intercontinental ballistic missiles are driven down a road during the military parade. Canister launchers are mounted on the back of trucks.

Intercontinental ballistic missiles are driven down a road during the military parade. Canister launchers are mounted on the back of trucks.

© REUTERS

© REUTERS

Intercontinental ballistic missiles are driven down a road during the military parade. Canister launchers are mounted on the back of trucks.

Jacob Brandt and Saylor Copening

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






North Korea: The Smoke Continues to Rise

With the Cold War’s end in 1991 following the collapse of the Soviet Union, America was left the only superpower on the global stage. Throughout the 90s, peace and prosperity seemed to have spread across the country with no opposition. The idea of America reentering another long lasting conflict would have been absurd. However, as time progressed forward, the illusion that peace and prosperity could last faded away, as people realized the world’s conflicts were not completely resolved. Even today, it appears America is attempting to clean the mess from its longest stalemate with the Soviet Union. Particularly in the Korean Peninsula with North Korea testing missiles in the Pacific, the question emerges: Are the flames of the Cold War still burning?

With numerous threats sent by North Korea and twelve ballistic missile tests alone in the past year, it appears Kim Jong Un wants to reignite the fire that defined much of the second half of the twentieth century. This begs the question, why? Why would a country facing such economic travesty and famine want to pose as a strong military state? A reasonable inference: North Korea is attempting to illustrate a facade of strength intimidation and fear in order to establish a presence in the region for when it is prepared to take offence and attack.

When the ceasefire ending the Forgotten War was issued in 1953, both parties understood that the desire for a unified Korea was so strong. Because of this, it was clear that a border would not withstand the future. At some point or another the barriers separating these two countries will fall, and hopefully it is not long until the Cold War comes to a final conclusion.

North Korea: Missile Threats against the United States

North Korea has had a long history with the United States. Recently, President Donald Trump tweeted that he forced North Korea to fall back on its threat towards Guam. For those of you who don’t know Guam is a United States territory in Micronesia, in the Western Pacific. Many believe Trump could have caused this issue to escalate, causing Trump to miss the chance to prevent the tests of missiles, causing an uprise of fear in the United States.

The United States has two options. Try to calm down the tension brewing in the air or try to face the attack head on. Stopping all B-1B fights would mean cutting off the bilateral training with Japan and South Korea. The United States conducts these missions regularly as mandatory drills. Overall the United States has been given options, one including stopping all B-1B flights, or risking the missile attack. North Korea’s official news agency  released a picture of Kim Jong Un on August 15th, 2017. This picture depicts Kim Jong Un inspecting the command of a strategic force.

A delighted Kim Jong-Un celebrated the successful launch of a North Korean missile. Getty Images.

This photograph was intended to warn the United States that the threat is very much still on the table. If the United States chooses to ignore this photograph, Kim Jong Un would take it as an order to launch the missiles on Guam.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The student news site of Catalina Foothills High School
Korea: The Fire is Still Burning Nearly Half a Century Later